President Donald Trump surpassed a milestone in judicial appointments on Thursday as the Senate confirmed a new slate of district court nominees, including two Hispanics.

Trump has now appointed 102 judges, five this week. That total includes 37 to appeals courts, 63 to district, or trial courts, and two to the Supreme Court.

The Republican president and the GOP-led Senate have aggressively pushed to reshape the judiciary with conservatives.

Former Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley said in a tweet that he oversaw vetting of virtually all of the confirmed judges. The Iowa Republican described them as strict constructionists who read the law and the U.S. Constitution “as written instead of what suits their political goals.”

Most of Trump’s judicial selections so far have been white and male. But Thursday’s slate confirmed in quick succession included two Hispanics who received significant bipartisan support.

Rodolfo Armando Ruiz Ruiz was confirmed to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida by a vote of 90 to 8.

Currently a judge on the Florida Eleventh Judicial Circuit, Ruiz is a former prosecutor and associate at White & Case, Miami.

He’s a current member of the Federalist Society, an organization of conservatives and libertarians that has helped Trump select judicial nominees.

Raul M. Arias-Marxuach was confirmed to the District of Puerto Rico by a vote of 95 to 3. He’s a capital member at McConnell Valdes in San Juan.

He also clerked for Justice Antonio S. Negron-Garcia of the Puerto Rico Supreme Court, and is a former member of the Republican National Lawyers Association.

The Senate also confirmed Joshua Wolson to the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, by a vote of 65 to 33.

He’s a partner at Dilworth Paxson LLP in Philadelphia and a former associate at Covington & Burling in Washington.

Wolson is a current member of the Republican Jewish Coalition, the Republican National Lawyers Association, and the Federalist Society.

Democrats have criticized the judicial nomination and vetting process as overly partisan.

Trump’s three immediate predecessors each appointed more than 300 judges over two full terms.