Litigation powerhouse Quinn Emanuel elected its largest-ever partnership class consisting of 14 attorneys, half of which are women, the firm announced Dec. 3.

“We have the best young lawyers anywhere – it’s part of our commitment to bringing clients the best,” John Quinn, the firm’s managing partner, said in an announcement.

“Our electing so many partners this year reflects the quality of our hiring and our ability to train and nurture the world’s best young legal talent,” he added.

Four of the new partners come from offices outside the U.S. and three come from diverse backgrounds, according to the firm.

This year’s partner class is significantly larger than the 2018 class, which consisted of nine attorneys. The 2017 class had 13 lawyers, and the 2016 class had nine.

The partner election caps a busy period for the law firm. Quinn Emanuel expanded late last year, opening a new Boston office in December 2017. But it also suffered the loss of eight partners in January who left to start their own boutique firm, Selendy & Gay.

These included Phillipe Z. Selendy, who was chair of Quinn Emanuel’s securities and structured finance practices, and had led litigation against big banks over the sale of residential mortgage-backed securities in the aftermath of the Great Recession. The litigation recovered more than $25 billion for the federal government.

Faith E. Gay, co-chair of Quinn Emanuel’s national trial practice, also left.

Quinn Emanuel has more than 780 lawyers in 22 offices around the world. It’s the largest law firm in the world devoted solely to business litigation and arbitration.

It ranked 21st on the American Lawyer’s 2018 Am Law 200 ranking with a gross revenue of $1.23 billion in 2017.

The three-decades-old firm saw a major boost in revenue after 2007, when most firms began experiencing revenue declines due to the recession. This growth was fueled by its decision to start representing clients who were suing banks over fallout from Wall Street’s role in the financial crisis.

Quinn Emanuel went from 350 lawyers in four U.S. offices that year to 750 across 22 offices in the U.S., Asia, Europe, and Australia today. Its revenue rose from $385 million in 2007 to $1.2 billion in 2016, according Am Law figures.

With assistance from Casey Sullivan.