The last of the national Marriott worker strikes ended Dec. 3, with about 2,500 workers in San Francisco reaching a tentative agreement with the hotel chain, according to a union spokesperson.

The workers had been on strike for almost two months. A ratification vote will run until 5 p.m., but the union expects the agreement “to pass overwhelmingly,” UNITE HERE spokesperson Rachel Gumpert told Bloomberg Law.

This year counts the highest number of work stoppages in at least two decades, according to Bloomberg Law data.

Details of the Marriott deal weren’t immediately available, but workers had requested higher wages and an end to a controversial “green” policy for cleaning rooms that allegedly cuts shifts.

“In this time of rising inequality, it is crucial that our workers are able to earn a fair wage that allows them to live and support their families in the increasingly expensive Bay Area,” San Francisco Mayor London Breed said in a statement. “I am proud to have supported the workers as they fought for better wages, healthcare, and job security.”

Unionized housekeepers make at least $22 an hour in San Francisco, UNITE HERE Local 2 President Anand Singh previously told Bloomberg Law. A citywide minimum wage of $15 took effect in July, and California’s statewide minimum wage is $11 an hour.

Marriott hotel workers in San Jose and Oakland, Calif., Boston, Detroit, San Diego, and on Maui and Oahu in Hawaii were also part of the strike.