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Wake Up Call: Boies is Backing a Movie Based on ‘COPS’

Aug. 23, 2016, 12:08 PM

• The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has been flooded with thousands of comments over its proposal to ban contract language that requires binding arbitration, language that some critics say keeps thousands of consumers from accessing courts. (National Law Journal)

• The settlement announced last week in the dispute over control of Viacom Inc. offers several lessons . (DealBook)

• A film finance group started by David Boies and Zack Schiller, son of Boies, Schiller & Flexner co-founding partner Jonathan Schiller, is set to fund a movie based on the long-running reality TV series “COPS.” (Law.com)

• U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has taken on four clerks for work through June 2018, suggesting the 83-year-old court member intends to stay on no matter who is elected U.S. president in November. (Washington Post)

Legal Market

• Wachtell, Ropes & Gray, Davis Polk and Cooley are advising on Pfizer Inc.'s $14 billion acquisition of San Francisco-based Medivation, which makes the prostate cancer treatment drug Xtandi. (Am Law Daily)

• Volkswagen AG faces a tough fight against efforts by attorneys representing car owners, governments and investors to force the automaker to agree to settlements in its emissions-cheating scandal based on terms on par with the $15 billion U.S. agreement. (Wall Street Journal)

• A former Sullivan & Cromwell lawyer is leading a trustee’s $5.5 billion lawsuit against PwC, claiming it gave clean audits to a mortgage company, which collapsed after concocting phony assets as loan collateral. (Financial Times)

• Bird & Bird topped U.K. rankings for clean energy M&A in the first half of 2016, according to new data. (The Lawyer)

• A delay to the U.K.'s exit from the European Union following the June 23 Brexit vote could trigger a “shotgun divorce” creating more problems for the British economy. (BloombergView)

• Members of Northern Ireland’s legislative body last week created a new legal hurdle to the U.K.’s plan to leave the European Union, filing a lawsuit seeking a judicial review of the plan. (Bloomberg/Big Law Business)

Courts

• A Massachusetts probate judge said Friday he will consider a request by Sumner Redstone’s granddaughter to require the 92-year-old media billionaire to undergo a mental examination, in a case related to the settlement in the fight over control of Viacom Inc. (Bloomberg)

• A California federal court ruled 2-1 Monday that an Ernst & Young contract clause requiring employees to submit to individual arbitration in their overtime disputes violates their rights to collective action under the National Labor Relations Act, but the case looks likely to reach the U.S. Supreme Court. (The Recorder)

• California’s highest court Monday left intact lifetime job security for public school teachers, declining to review a lower court decision that the state’s tenure system doesn’t violate students’ right to an education. (Bloomberg/Big Law Business)

• A Florida federal judge is scheduled to consider Tuesday a request by attorneys to withdraw from representing U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown in a corruption case against her. (Washington Post/A.P.)

• A Texas federal judge Sunday blocked the Obama administration from enforcing its directive that U.S. public schools allow transgender students to use bathrooms and locker rooms according to their gender identity. (Bloomberg/Big Law Business)

• An age-bias class-action complaint filed last week alleges that Hewlett-Packard has laid off tens of thousands of of older workers since 2012 while clearly favoring younger people in hiring. (The Recorder)

Laterals and Moves

• An attorney who unsuccessfully argued in favor of state bans on same-sex marriage in the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark Obergefell v. Hodgescase last year is opening a solo boutique in Caledonia, Michigan, which he said will become “the smallest town in America with a Supreme Court practice.” (National Law Journal)

• A former McDermott intellectual property attorney who once tangled with the blood-testing startup Theranos Inc. in a trade secrets dispute is joining Vinson & Elkins in Washington, along with the co-owner of a boutique the two started in 2010. (Am Law Daily)

• Rebecca Bell, risk and compliance head for the struggling listed firm Slater & Gordon, has left for a similar job at U.K. firm Bates Wells Braithwaite. (The Lawyer)

• Partners at London-based Ashurst and Chinese-global giant King & Wood Mallesons are having to wait for profit distributions after the two firms delayed payments. (Law.com)

• Elite U.K. law firm Clifford Chance announced Monday that it has entered into an association with the newly established Abuhumed Alsheikh Alhagbani Law Firm (AS&H) in Saudi Arabia, to replace its existing stand-alone Saudi-licensed firm that has faced challenges in local courts. (Big Law Business)

Technology

• Citigroup Inc. mistakenly sent e-mails to some active Costco Wholesale Corp. members telling them their wholesale club membership had lapsed and their cards would be canceled, bringing a fresh headache to a new Visa card partnership. (Bloomberg)

• Hillary Clinton faced new questions about potential conflicts of interest between her family’s foundation and her work at the State Department as well as the prospect that more e-mails from her private account will be released right up to the November presidential election. (Bloomberg)

• Former New York Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, now vice chairman of K2 Intelligence, said cybersecurity should be “ everyone’s problem,” because it is linked to virtually all risks facing companies today. (Legaltech News)

• The chairs of an American Bar Association panel responded to recent criticism by LegalZoom co-founder Eddie Hartman of their recent report on their view of the future of legal services. (Above The Law)

• New York- and Dubai-based startup Media.Net, which provides technology that powers contextual ads offered by Yahoo! and Microsoft’s Bing, said it will be acquired by Chinese investors for some $900 million, in a move akin to a reverse merger . (Bloomberg)

• Ten years from now it will be “routine” for attorneys in toxic tort cases to examine plaintiffs’ genetic information for evidence, a law school professor asserted, while other legal experts predict the science will have a limited impact. (Big Law Business)

• A California lawmaker has revived a stalled bill that would impose a “reasonably prudent” standard for businesses to protect personal consumer data, including geolocation and biometric information. (Bloomberg/Big Law Business)

• Google’s latest Android version dubbed “Nougat” shows how good the mobile operating system already is. (Wired)

Legal Education

• Wells Fargo agreed to pay some $4 million to settle a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau probe over allegations the bank charged illegal fees for student loans and failed to inform borrowers of their payment options. (National Law Journal)

• As law students get ready for the new academic year about to begin, a group of prominent attorneys recalled their favorite law school courses and what they learned from them. (Law.com)

Miscellaneous

• A lawyer for Melania Trump said he has warned several news organizations they face defamation lawsuits for publishing articles that suggest the wife of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump was an “escort” in the 1990s. (New York Times)

• A proposed Obama administration rule that would allow tenants to sue their landlords for discriminatory conduct by their neighbors cleared a key hurdle although it faces strong resistance by public housing authorities and landlords. (WSJ Law Blog)

• California’s legislature has two conflicting bills on state bar dues to consider as it nears the end of its session. (The Recorder)

• Two Florida men were charged with operating a fake law firm without a license to practice law, and advertising their business as a firm with an “elite network of over 100 attorneys” to recruit junior lawyers to do their work. (Big Law Business)

• A big law attorney who fund raises for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton successfully litigated for a Republican candidate in a New York state election dispute. (Big Law Business)

• Would Ryan Lochte’s real lawyer please stand up ? (Big Law Business)

Compiled by Rick Mitchell and edited by Casey Sullivan.